Images that are missing alt text

This table contains all of the images on this website and reflects whether or not they have defined proper alt text for those who use a screen reader or even just fans of text-only RSS readers.

Title Slug Image path Alt text
Retrieving credentials from Jenkins retrieving-jenkins-credentials 01-credential-view.png A screenshot of the Jenkins UI. It is showing the credentials section. It depicts a password entry called 'My super secret password' although no actual credentials are visible.
Retrieving credentials from Jenkins retrieving-jenkins-credentials 02-credential-update.png A screenshot of the Jenkins UI progressed from the previous image. Metadata about the selected credential are visible such as scope, ID and description. There is a secret field but it just contains dots like any normal password field does, rather than the actual password text.
Retrieving credentials from Jenkins retrieving-jenkins-credentials 03-inspect-element.png A screenshot of the Jenkins UI. The user has right clicked on the secret field of the credential metadata. Their browser context menu is visible, invoked by right clicking. The 'Inspect Element' item is highlighted but not yet clicked.
Retrieving credentials from Jenkins retrieving-jenkins-credentials 04-credential-hash.png A screenshot of the Firefox browser tools. The user has found the DOM node for the redacted input in the element selector pane. They have right clicked it, bringing up the browser context menu and have highlighted 'Copy attribute value' under the 'Attributes' submenu.
Retrieving credentials from Jenkins retrieving-jenkins-credentials 05-script-console.png A screenshot of the Jenkins UI. It shows the 'Script Console' page which lives under /script by default.
Retrieving credentials from Jenkins retrieving-jenkins-credentials 06-final-result.png A screenshot of the Jenkins Script Console UI. The user has pasted the copied input from the Firefox browser tools that was open in an earlier screenshot. This input has been wrapped in some Jenkins functions. Below the Script Console is an output area with the actual password of the credential that was previously redacted.
October october selector_main.png A screenshot of October. Visible is a macOS window in the foreground with the background wallpaper visible behind it. The window shows that a Kobo Libra H20 is currently connected. On the right is a single button that asks if the user would like to sync 249 highlights to Readwise. At the bottom is a toast saying that 217 highlights were sent to Readwise successfully.
Do demo iPads have a canonical owner? ipad-canonical-owner storedisplay.jpg A photo of an iPad Pro set up for display inside of a Noel Leeming store. Visible on the iPad is the Photos app set to the time period spanning 17 - 25th July 2019
Do demo iPads have a canonical owner? ipad-canonical-owner calendar.jpg A screenshot of the macOS Calendar app visible on the author's computer. 11 events are visible across five different calendars.
Do demo iPads have a canonical owner? ipad-canonical-owner kids.jpg A screenshot of the macOS Calendar app visible on the author's computer. The Kids calendar is selected.
Do demo iPads have a canonical owner? ipad-canonical-owner personal.jpg A screenshot of the macOS Calendar app visible on the author's computer. The Personal calendar is selected.
Do demo iPads have a canonical owner? ipad-canonical-owner recreation.jpg A screenshot of the macOS Calendar app visible on the author's computer. The Recreation calendar is selected.
Do demo iPads have a canonical owner? ipad-canonical-owner training.jpg A screenshot of the macOS Calendar app visible on the author's computer. The Training calendar is selected.
Do demo iPads have a canonical owner? ipad-canonical-owner work.jpg A screenshot of the macOS Calendar app visible on the author's computer. The Work calendar is selected.
Do demo iPads have a canonical owner? ipad-canonical-owner contacts.jpg A screenshot of the macOS Contacts app visible on the author's computer. A contact entry for Shota Aoyagi is selected. They have an iCloud email and allegedly live in Rochester, New York. Their contact card has a stock photo.
Do demo iPads have a canonical owner? ipad-canonical-owner notes.jpg A screenshot of the macOS Preview app showing a PDF. The PDF is an exported Apple Note showing a sketch for a treehouse. The note is titled "Jake's treehouse!!"
Do demo iPads have a canonical owner? ipad-canonical-owner numbers.jpg A screenshot of the macOS Preview app displaying a preview of a Number spreadsheet. Visible is a planning document for a garden party which lists a number of hosts and guests. A number of tasks are planned to be done between June and July. There are 4 sheets in total.
Do demo iPads have a canonical owner? ipad-canonical-owner pages.jpg A screenshot of the macOS Preview app displaying a preview of a Pages document. Visible is a page about the Leaning Tower of Pisa. It talks about the history of the tower and how it wasn't always leaning.
Do demo iPads have a canonical owner? ipad-canonical-owner slides.jpg A screenshot of the macOS Preview app displaying a preview of a Keynote slide. Visible is a picture of Old Faithful, a geyser at Yellowstone National Park. The slide talks about what makes geysers spew water.
Do demo iPads have a canonical owner? ipad-canonical-owner maps.jpg A screenshot of the macOS Maps app. A map collection titled "iPad Demo Unit Places" is selected on the right. Visible in the main window is North America which depicts a number of bookmarked locations.
Do demo iPads have a canonical owner? ipad-canonical-owner photos.jpg A screenshot of the macOS Finder app. Visible is a photo of a dog with metadata about the photo visible on the right side.
Using Fastmail with CalDAV libraries fastmail-caldav calendar-settings.png A screenshot of the author's Fastmail account, showing the Settings page. The Calendars tab is highlighted in the left sidebar. Three calendars are visible in the background with a modal open in the foreground. The modal has two sections: One deals with exporting a calendar. The other has a text box with the CalDAV URL for the selected calendar. An arrow is pointing to the text box. The contents of the textbox is highlighted up to the end of the segment containing the author's email. The ID at the end is not selected although this is not visible as it is blurred out.
Plex + Tidal = A Nice Match plex-tidal-together spotify-remote-session.jpg A screenshot of the Spotify desktop client open to the album White Pony by the band Deftones. The track "Change (In the House of Flies)" is currently playing. At the bottom of the screen is a green banner that says "Listening on Marcus's iPhone". This indicates that the user is able to remotely control the session from their desktop.
Plex + Tidal = A Nice Match plex-tidal-together apple-music-session.jpg
Plex + Tidal = A Nice Match plex-tidal-together apple-music-too-many-devices.jpg
Plex + Tidal = A Nice Match plex-tidal-together https://s29.q4cdn.com/628966176/files/images/board/blockheads-BOD-jayz.png
Plex + Tidal = A Nice Match plex-tidal-together plexamp-add-to-library.jpg
Plex + Tidal = A Nice Match plex-tidal-together plexamp-jak-jay.jpg
Plex + Tidal = A Nice Match plex-tidal-together plexamp-cross-search.jpg
Plex + Tidal = A Nice Match plex-tidal-together plexamp-home.jpg
Plex + Tidal = A Nice Match plex-tidal-together https://www.plex.tv/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/scrolling-mixes.gif
Plex + Tidal = A Nice Match plex-tidal-together https://www.plex.tv/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/on-this-day-crop-800x390.png
Plex + Tidal = A Nice Match plex-tidal-together plexamp-mood.jpg
Plex + Tidal = A Nice Match plex-tidal-together utf9k-nowplaying.jpg
Plex + Tidal = A Nice Match plex-tidal-together plex-remote-session.jpg
Plex + Tidal = A Nice Match plex-tidal-together plex-status-page.jpg
Plex + Tidal = A Nice Match plex-tidal-together tool-trio.jpg
Plex + Tidal = A Nice Match plex-tidal-together plexamp-not-pausing.jpg
Plex + Tidal = A Nice Match plex-tidal-together plexamp-upnext.jpg
Sampling all the way down sampling-all-the-way-down https://datadog-docs.imgix.net/images/tracing/apm_lifecycle/apm_lifecycle_0.c5017c20b222d73a29b5a1a223f83eb4.png?auto=format A diagram showing various parts of the Datadog ingestion pipeline. The screenshot is just meant to reflect the sprawl of different bits involved in the pipeline. The actual elements of the pipeline itself aren't so important for this image.
Sampling all the way down sampling-all-the-way-down apps.jpg A version of the Datadog ingestion pipeline, with a section titled Your instrumented apps being selected. It reflects the part of the pipeline we are going to discuss in this section.
Sampling all the way down sampling-all-the-way-down apps.jpg The same Datadog ingestion pipeline shown in the previous image with no changes.
Sampling all the way down sampling-all-the-way-down https://datadog-docs.imgix.net/images/tracing/trace_indexing_and_ingestion/service_traffic_breakdown.a0e421f3503064b7d03f1c3683a67fc4.png?auto=format A screenshot of the Datadog service ingestion screen showing a service that has <0.1% of traces sampled due to agent CPU or RAM usage
Sampling all the way down sampling-all-the-way-down https://datadog-docs.imgix.net/images/tracing/apm_lifecycle/ingestion_sampling_rules.664739c275df2d563b782552d467422e.png?auto=format A version of the Datadog ingestion pipeline, with a section titled Ingestion sampling rules being selected. It reflects the part of the pipeline we are going to discuss in this section.
Sampling all the way down sampling-all-the-way-down https://datadog-docs.imgix.net/images/tracing/trace_indexing_and_ingestion/service_ingestion_summary.fd43c5c59b2c9273cd84e8467b958194.png?auto=format A screenshot of the Service Ingestion Summary screen showing a service. Visible to the right side are all of the upstream services that have influence on the displayed services trace sampling decisions.
Sampling all the way down sampling-all-the-way-down https://datadog-docs.imgix.net/images/tracing/apm_lifecycle/retention_filters.5e6f2b4eedbe790caf41a7e090048deb.png?auto=format A version of the Datadog ingestion pipeline, with a section titled Retention filters being selected. It reflects the part of the pipeline we are going to discuss in this section.
Sampling all the way down sampling-all-the-way-down https://imgix.datadoghq.com/img/blog/engineering/computing-accurate-percentiles-with-ddsketch/ddsketch_diagram_6_190911.png?auto=format&fit=max&w=847&dpr=2 A screenshot showing latency buckets. There are three labelled 100 milliseconds, 102 milliseconds and 104 milliseconds. Traces that a few decimal places outside of each bucket are sampled into their closest buckets. For example, a trace that took 104.4 milliseconds is sampled into the 104 millisecond bucket.
How can I configure my printer via terminal on macOS? macos-printer-cli printer-overview.png A screenshot of the macOS System Preferences pane for printing. It shows one registered printer on the left called example-printer which is sitting idle. It has the type Generic PostScript Printer. Nothing here indicates the queue name.
How can I configure my printer via terminal on macOS? macos-printer-cli printer-settings.png A screenshot of the macOS System Preferences pane. It has the settings window open for the printer from earlier called example-printer. There are only a few piece of information such as device name and driver version which are not helpful at all. There is only a single interactive checkbox with the label Use Generic Printer Features with no description of what that means. There is still nothing to indicate the queue name we are looking for.
What is using Port 5000 on macOS Monterey? macos-port-5000-monterey 403-forbidden.png A Brave browser window showing 403 Forbidden when trying to view localhost port 5000
What is using Port 5000 on macOS Monterey? macos-port-5000-monterey whomport.png A screenshot showing two windows. One is a Terminal with the output of a command called whomport. It shows Control Center listening on Port 5000 with the Process ID 2273. Behind the Terminal is Activity Monitor. Control Center is highlighted and indeed has the same Process ID of 2273.
What is using Port 5000 on macOS Monterey? macos-port-5000-monterey airplay-sharing.png A screenshot showing the Sharing pane of macOS System Preferences. Airplay Receiver has been unticked.
Twitter, could you please fix your image servers? twitter-image-servers-2021 twitter-dm-huge-l.png A Twitter direct message where the author posts an image that fails to load and the recipient says "huge L the image isn't loading".
Twitter, could you please fix your image servers? twitter-image-servers-2021 twitter-dm-alt-text.png A Twitter direct message where the author receives an image that fails to load, asks "got any alt text?" and the other person responds with an accessibility style description of what is in the image. The tone of the interaction is one of lighthearted humour.
Twitter, could you please fix your image servers? twitter-image-servers-2021 twitter-dm-revenue.png A Twitter direct message where the author receives an image that fails to load and responds with "Guess who has $3 billion in revenue but still can't display photos in DMs :)"
Twitter, could you please fix your image servers? twitter-image-servers-2021 timeout.png A screenshot of a terminal window with two curl commands. The first is requesting an image link over http port 80 in verbose mode. It responds as expected, with the content being a redirect to https. The second command is the prior link but accessed via https and it fails with a timeout.
Fixing a WSL2 VHD conversion issue wsl2-vhd-issue compressed.png A screenshot showing Windows Explorer. It is open to C:/Users/Marcus/AppData/Local/Packages. A folder is highlighted to indicate it was recently clicked on. The properties window for that folder is visible showing metadata. Overlaying the properties window is the Advanced Attributes window where a checkbox labelled 'Compress contents to save disk space' is checked. The author is showing that you should uncheck that box to fix the issue described in this post.
One possible death for Discord one-possible-death-for-discord discord-overlay.jpg A mock screenshot from the original Discord support pages. It shows a game, possibly Fortnite, in the background obscured by two large windows. The window on the left shows some channels within a Discord server. The window on the right shows the contents of the selected channel, called #pallet-town.
One possible death for Discord one-possible-death-for-discord profiles.png A screenshot showing the Discord client. It's a regular macOS window with extremely dim, unreadable text in the background with a green modal in the forefront. It shows the authors Discord profile name at the top. In the middle is a block that reads "Listening to Spotify". It depicts the author is currently listening to the song "Imbrium - 0edit Remix" by "Ed Harrison" on Spotify. The user is provided a link to listen along with the author, adding to the idea of Discord being a meta-layer between users and a music streaming service in this case. At the bottom is a two column grid showing a variety of links to profiles such as Battle.NET, Github, Spotify and Steam.
How can I run a Homebrew application being blocked by Gatekeeper? macos-homebrew-app-blocked gatekeeper.png A macOS prompt stating that an application called matterhorn cannot be opened because the developer cannot be verified. The user is given the option to either move the application to the recycle bin or to cancel the interaction.
FAQ driven configuration faq-driven-configuration search.png A screenshot of Github code search. The author has typed "what is listening on a port" into the code search against their dotfiles and found a matching file. The match isn't exactly what they typed in but close enough as if to suggest that searching for questions you've previously answered may be easier with this method.
How can I find out why my Mac has restarted? macos-check-shutdown-cause normal-shutdown.png An iTerm2 window showing the results of the command mentioned above. There is one result for a previous shutdown with the cause code of 5. This indicates a normal shutdown.
How can I find out why my Mac has restarted? macos-check-shutdown-cause abnormal-shutdown.png A macOS Terminal window showing the results of the previous command on a different machine. There are seven results for a cause code of -128. This indicates an abnormal shutdown.
Dropbox is way too clingy dropbox-is-way-too-clingy 01-settings.png A tightly cropped screenshot of the upper right corner of the Dropbox main view. The authors account is visible and the Settings button is highlighted.
Dropbox is way too clingy dropbox-is-way-too-clingy 02-inside-settings.png A screenshot of the Dropbox account settings. There are a variety of radio buttons and tabs but the main item of interest is a link at the bottom titled "Delete account".
Dropbox is way too clingy dropbox-is-way-too-clingy 03-first-screen.png A page asking the author if they would like to downgrade. It says that the author has to downgrade their account, that they'll lose a bunch of storage and lists some consequences such as "Dropbox will stop syncing". At the bottom are two buttons, one in blue that reads "I changed my mind, take me back to Dropbox" and one in white that reads "I still want to downgrade". The downgrade button is clearly what the user is after but the colour coding makes it tricky since the "I don't want to cancel" one is more prominent.
Dropbox is way too clingy dropbox-is-way-too-clingy 04-second-screen.png A pop up modal asking if the author still wants to cancel. It has a bunch of radio buttons with reasons for cancellation, with the author having selected one that reads "I found another product I liked better". There is a button labelled "Skip" in the bottom left and two buttons on the bottom right. They read "Don't cancel" and "Continue cancelling". Strangely, "Continue cancelling" is the more prominent of the two, unlike the previous page.
Dropbox is way too clingy dropbox-is-way-too-clingy 05-third-screen.png Another page with the title "Dropbox Plus is so much more than just space" and presents some alleged reasons to stay like "Easy sharing" and "Large storage volume". These are the same bullet points, roughly, as the earlier page. At the bottom are two buttons, a prominent blue one on the left titled "Keep Dropbox Plus" and a transparent, less obvious one on the right titled "I still want to downgrade".
Dropbox is way too clingy dropbox-is-way-too-clingy 06-final-screen.png Yet another page titled "Before you go, Marcus...", addressed to the author. It has a large blue button in the middle of the screen that reads "I changed my mind, take me back to Dropbox". There is another button for cancelling somewhere off screen that is not visible to the reader. The rest of the page just roughly lists the same claimed features as previous pages.
Dropbox is way too clingy dropbox-is-way-too-clingy 07-done.png A tightly cropped screenshot of a green banner that reads "Account downgraded. Thanks for your feedback."
Dropbox is way too clingy dropbox-is-way-too-clingy 08-banner.png A tightly cropped screenshot of a red banner that reads "You are scheduled to downgrade."
Dropbox is way too clingy dropbox-is-way-too-clingy 01-settings.png A tightly cropped screenshot of the upper right corner of the Dropbox main view. The authors account is visible and the Settings button is highlighted.
Dropbox is way too clingy dropbox-is-way-too-clingy 02-inside-settings.png A screenshot of the Dropbox account settings. There are a variety of radio buttons and tabs but the main item of interest is a link at the bottom titled "Delete account".
Dropbox is way too clingy dropbox-is-way-too-clingy 09-delete.png A form that says "Permanently delete your Dropbox account" with three inputs: one for your password, one for your reason for leaving and a third to enter in more details.
Dropbox is way too clingy dropbox-is-way-too-clingy 10-free.png A tightly cropped screenshot of a black banner that reads "Your account has been deleted. We're sorry to see you go."
Remind the user what your service does remind-the-user-what-your-service-does nvultra.png An email snippet from nvUltra explaning how they have been infrequent with updates and then providing a detailed reminder on what nvUltra actually is, in simple english.
Reducing my everyday carry during 2019 reducing-my-edc-2019 01-original-carry.jpeg An aerial photo of a table containing items I carry each day, with pieces of paper beside each item describing the problems with each. The photo contains my phone, wallet, keys and wired earbuds. I didn't actually have the wired earbuds anymore so I've just drawn a picture to represent them.
Reducing my everyday carry during 2019 reducing-my-edc-2019 02-wallet-old.jpeg A close up photo of a table with my wallet folded open on it. A piece of paper represents my transit card as I no longer had it at the time of writing this post.
Reducing my everyday carry during 2019 reducing-my-edc-2019 03-cards-scattered.jpeg An aerial photo of a table with numerous cards scattered around. There are different types from loyalty cards to business cards, as described below.
Reducing my everyday carry during 2019 reducing-my-edc-2019 04-business-cards.jpeg A close up photo of two business cards. One is for stripe.com and another is for readme.com.
Reducing my everyday carry during 2019 reducing-my-edc-2019 05-loyalty-cards.jpeg A closeup photo of my phone with the table and cards in the background, although heavily blurred. The screen of my phone is open to an application that shows digital versions of the loyalty cards. More specifically, the barcodes for each of the physical cards has been captured onto my phone.
Reducing my everyday carry during 2019 reducing-my-edc-2019 06-gpay-cards.jpeg A closeup photo of my phone with Google Pay open to show my digital bank card. Thankfully any identifying information has been removed. For effect, behind the phone to the side is the table again with my physical bank cards sitting on it, although blurred out for effect.
Reducing my everyday carry during 2019 reducing-my-edc-2019 07-hop.jpeg A close up photo of a table surface containing three items: A piece of paper representing my physical transit card, an arrow pointing to the right and a smaller, badge sized transit card designed for keychains. The arrow is supposed to symbolise that I've gone from one transit card to another.
Reducing my everyday carry during 2019 reducing-my-edc-2019 08-cards.jpeg A close up photo of a table surface showing the smaller transit card to the left, a few remaining physical cards that I like to keep around and a carabiner containing various house keys.
Reducing my everyday carry during 2019 reducing-my-edc-2019 09-wallet-disassembled.jpeg A close up photo of a table surface containing a metal device that has been unscrewed. The base plate is on the right with three little stands to provide room in between itself and the top plate. The idea is that the cards sit in between the gap. The top plate is red and sitting to the left of the base plate with three small screws sitting just below it.
Reducing my everyday carry during 2019 reducing-my-edc-2019 10-wallet-setup.jpeg A close up photo of a table surface with just the metal base plate from the previous photo. Two of the little stands appear to have two keys sitting on them, tucked nicely so they don't extend beyond the base plate itself. The third stand has a small USB drive sitting on it.
Reducing my everyday carry during 2019 reducing-my-edc-2019 11-wallet-underside.jpeg A close up photo of a table surface with the assembled metal wallet sitting on it. The wallet is upside down, with the keys and USB drive extended beyond the base plate. The bottom of the base plate is visible, as the wallet is upside down, and has a large clip at the bottom for slotting cards into.
Reducing my everyday carry during 2019 reducing-my-edc-2019 12-wallet-underside-full.jpeg A side photo of the assembled metal wallet, sitting on a table surface. The previously mentioned clip has been filled with about 8 to 10 physical cards at a glance. They seem to be tightly secured.
Reducing my everyday carry during 2019 reducing-my-edc-2019 13-wallet-top.jpeg An aerial photo of the assembled metal wallet sitting on a table surface. It is positioned right side up this time showing the red top plate. On top of the red plate is the small badge sized transit card, seemingly hovering in place. It's actually attached to a velcro strip although you can't visually tell that from the photo.
Reducing my everyday carry during 2019 reducing-my-edc-2019 14-wallet-side.jpeg A side photo of the assembled metal wallet sitting on a table surface. It's positioned in the same way as the previous photo just with the angle being from the side. If the reader were to squint, they could make out the velcro strip mentioned before but no attention is drawn to it.
Reducing my everyday carry during 2019 reducing-my-edc-2019 15-wired-earbuds.jpeg A close up photo of a table surface with two pieces of paper. One on the left says "Such a mess to untangle" with a sad face and an arrow pointing to the right. The piece of paper on the right is a ridiculously bad drawing of wired earbuds with text at the top that reads "Wired earbuds". I no longer had the them in my position so this is supposed to be a placeholder for the real thing.
Reducing my everyday carry during 2019 reducing-my-edc-2019 16-wireless-earbuds.jpeg A side view of a table with two pieces of paper and a red almost electronic pouch looking thing that has a red glowing light. It's actually a pair of Sony WF-1000XM3 Wireless Earbuds in their carry card but unfortunately, it's hard to make out in the photo. Maybe it's just hard to make out on my monitor. Anyway, the pieces of paper are the paper placeholder of my wired earbuds and an arrow pointing right to indicate they've transformed into the new wireless earbuds.
Reducing my everyday carry during 2019 reducing-my-edc-2019 17-all-three.jpeg A close up of three items on the table surface. To the right, and closest to the camera, is my phone. It's the Google Pixel 3a and it shows a almost purely black lock screen except for the time, some Japanese song playing on Spotify and the weather which is 19 degrees celcius at the time of the photo. To the right, also close to the camera is the carry case for the Sony wireless earbuds. At the back of the photo, and quite blurred, is the metallic wallet.
Reducing my everyday carry during 2019 reducing-my-edc-2019 18-all-third-alt.jpeg A mid range shot of the same three items from the previous photo on a table surface. They are just sitting in a slightly different configuration but the details are all the same.
Deepfakes deepfakes celebs.png An diagram depicting how faces can be mapped to one another. The diagram shows photos of 6 celebrities and then shows how they look when transformed into a spherical shape. Various facial features such as eyes and nose roughly share the same positions, unlike in the regular photos used in the comparison.
Deepfakes deepfakes cats.png Similar to the previous image, this diagram shows the process of transforming six photos of various cats into more spherical representations.
Latency as a forcing function latency-as-a-forcing-function empty-frame.png A screenshot of a dead Mattermost client. It's an electron desktop app but all it is rendering is a single tab and the rest of the screen is blank. There are no loading indicators at all.
Latency as a forcing function latency-as-a-forcing-function clear-cache.png A screenshot of the View menu for Mattermost. It shows a number of options with "Clear cache and Reload" being highlighted. This menu also contained an item called "Developer Tools for Current Server" which we will be accessing later.
Latency as a forcing function latency-as-a-forcing-function loading-stuck.png A screenshot of the previously mentioned developer tools. They look identical to the usual browser developer tools. The Network tab is selected which shows a single HTTP request for a document that returned the status code 200 OK. It took 300 milliseconds but despite that, the frame is still blank. The browser tools give the impression that the application has finished loading despite that not being the case.
Latency as a forcing function latency-as-a-forcing-function total-load-time.png A screenshot of the Network tab which contains 87 requests. That's a lot! The network transfer waterfall spans 65 seconds which is crazy for a website. A number of the requests span anywhere between 300ms and 5 seconds.
Latency as a forcing function latency-as-a-forcing-function standup-raven.png A screenshot of the Network tab that has been cropped to just a couple of network transfers. One for a plugin called Standup Raven has been selected which took a total of 19 seconds to download!
Latency as a forcing function latency-as-a-forcing-function plugin-installation-size.png A screenshot showing the Javascript bundle for Standup Raven open in the authors Downloads directory using macOS finder. This finder window is sitting open over the top of the latest Github release. The Github release shown distributes tar.gz bundles for Windows, macOS and Linux. Each tar.gz is 11MB with the downloaded bundle while the main.js bundle the author downloaded is 7.4MB. This lines up with the download size mentioned before.
When automation goes horribly right automation-right confusion-one.png A screenshot of a Twitter direct message. On the left is an automated message from the user. It reads "Hey there, lease a message after the beep. This has been an automated message". On the right is a reply from a surprised user who asks how the automated message was created.
When automation goes horribly right automation-right confusion-two.png A screenshot of a Twitter direct message, many months after the one just shown previously. On the left are some messages expressing surprise at having found an automated response. On the right is the author expressing confusion, due to having forgot any such automated messages exist.
When automation goes horribly right automation-right confusion-two.png A screenshot of a Twitter direct message. On the left is a user saying that the automated messaging is still intact. On the right is the author, typing in full capital letters to express disbelief, stating that they have tried to turn off this automated feature but can't figure out how.
When automation goes horribly right automation-right welcome-messages.png A screenshot of a Windows terminal. A command has been run and the image depicts the output. The command is a utility called twurl and a GET request is being made to the welcome_messages API endpoint. The output shows a list with one item which is the automated message that this post has been describing. The nightmare is finally over.
Remaining items to be fixed: 16 / 106